Calculating and Reporting Uncertainties and Errors

Calculating and Reporting Uncertainties and Errors

There  are  uncertainties  associated  with  any  measurement,  and  correct  reporting  of  the   results  of  any  experiment  will  include  these  uncertainties.  This  document  describes   the  type  of  uncertainties,  the  way  to  calculate  them,  and  how  they  should  be  reported.

Absolute  Uncertainty

When  the  uncertainty  is  reported  as  a  value  in  the  same  units  as  the  measured   quantity,  it  is  referred  to  as  an  absolute  uncertainty.  The  following  are  examples  of   values  written  with  absolute  uncertainty:

20  ±  0.2  meters     140  ±  12  kilograms     400  ±  13  days

Absolute  uncertainties  are  often  easy  to  determine,  especially  if  you  make  the   measurement  and  there  is  some  uncertainty  associated  with  the  device  used  for   measuring.  For  instance,  if  you  use  a  ruler  with  millimeter  increments  to  measure  a   piece  of  wood,  you  can  only  be  certain  of  your  results  to  within  the  millimeter.  In  this   case,  you  would  report  a  measured  value  of  10  cm  as:  10  ±  0.1  cm

Percent  Uncertainty

If  the  absolute  uncertainty  is  converted  to  a  percentage  of  the  measured  value,  then  the   uncertainty  can  be  given  as  a  percent  uncertainty.  The  same  three  examples  above   expressed  as  percent  uncertainties  would  be  written  as:

20  m  ±  1%     140  kg  ±  8.6%     400  d  ±  3.25%

Both  absolute  and  percent  uncertainties  are  important,  since  addition  and   multiplication  of  uncertain  values  will  require  using  each.

Percent  Error

Very  often  you  may  want  to  compare  a  result  to  a  known  value.  One  method  by  which   you  can  report  accuracy  is  percent  error,  which  is  a  measure  of  how  different  your   result  is  from  a  known  value.  The  following  formula  is  used  to  calculate  percent  error:

 

% Error = Measured −Known Known

×100%

When  you  calculate  percent  error,  you  use  the  absolute  measured  value,  ignoring  the   uncertainty.  Note  that  while  the  percent  equation  result  is  always  positive,  you  may   wish  to  report  the  error  as  negative  if  it  is  below  the  known  value.

Example  of  Percent  Error  Calculation

A  student  weighs  a  block  using  a  scale  with  1  g  increments,  and  records  the  mass  as   343  ±  1  grams.  If  the  known  value  of  the  mass  is  351  grams,  then  the  percent  error  is:

 

% Error = 343 − 351 351

×100% = 2.3%

The  percent  error  could  be  reported  as  “2.3%  below  the  known  value”.

 

Computation  of  Uncertainties  When  Adding  or  Multiplying

Suppose  you  wish  to  add  or  multiply  many  different  values,  each  of  which  has  an   associated  uncertainty.  What  is  the  uncertainty  of  the  final  result?  In  general,  the   following  two  rules  apply  when  doing  such  calculations:

1) If  you  are  adding  or  subtracting  measurements,  the  absolute  uncertainty  of  the   result  is  the  sum  of  the  absolute  uncertainties  of  each  measurement.

2) If  you  are  multiplying  or  dividing  measurements,  the  percent  uncertainty  of  the   result  is  the  sum  of  the  percent  uncertainties  of  each  measurement.

Note  that  one  calculation  gives  absolute  uncertainty  and  the  other  percent  uncertainty.   You  may  have  to  convert  between  the  two  depending  on  how  you  wish  to  present  your   results.

 

Example  of  Uncertainty  When  Adding

A  student  measures  the  voltage  across  three  resistors  and  gets  the  following  results:

Resistor  1:    6.5  ±  0.3  V     Resistor  2:    8.3  ±  0.5  V     Resistor  3:    1.5  ±  0.1  V     The  total  voltage  drop  across  all  three  resistors  is  the  sum  of  all  three  voltages,  and  in   this  case  would  be  equal  to:

Total  Voltage  =  Resistor  1  +  Resistor  2  +  Resistor  3  =  16.3  ±  0.9  V     Expressed  as  a  percent  uncertainty,  this  result  would  be  16.3  V  ±  5.5%

Example  of  Uncertainty  When  Multiplying  or  Dividing

You  wish  to  determine  the  density  of  a  block  of  wood  by  measuring  the  mass  and   volume.

The  volume  is  calculated  by  measuring  the  three  sides  of  the  block.  Including   uncertainties,  you  measure  the  following  three  side  lengths:

A  =  6.3  ±  0.1  cm     B  =  8.4  ±  0.1  cm     C  =  2.7  ±  0.1  cm

The  volume  of  the  block  is  simply  the  product  of  the  three  sides:  A  *  B  *  C.  To  correctly   report  the  uncertainty  of  the  volume,  you  need  to  add  the  percent  uncertainty  of  each   of  the  three  sides.  Written  as  percent  uncertainties,  the  side  lengths  are:

A  =  6.3  cm  ±  1.6%     B  =  8.4  cm  ±  1.2%     C  =  2.7  cm  ±  3.7%

The  volume  of  the  block  should  therefore  be  reported  as:

Volume  =  (6.3  *  8.4  *  2.7)  cm  ±  (1.6  +  1.2  +  3.7)%  =  142.9  cm3  ±  6.5%

Expressed  using  absolute  uncertainty,  the  volume  would  be:

Volume  =  142.9  ±  9.3  cm3

Using  a  scale  with  1  g  increments,  you  measure  the  mass  as:

Mass  =  82  ±  1  g

Which,  expressed  as  a  percent  uncertainty,  is:

Mass  =  82  g  ±  1.2%

The  final  calculation  of  density  equals  the  mass  divided  by  the  volume.  The  percent   uncertainty  of  the  density  is  the  sum  of  the  percent  uncertainty  of  volume  and  mass:

Density  =  (82/142.9)  g/cm3  ±  (6.5  +  1.2)%  =  0.57  g/cm3  ±  7.7%

Expressed  using  absolute  uncertainty:

Density  =  0.57  ±  0.044  g/cm3

 

 


Comments are closed.