Career and Technical Education

Career and Technical Education

Program Procedures Manual

Ruben Treviño, CTE Director

Letty Salinas, Secretary

Aurora M. Betancourt, Clerk

Vanessa Treviño, CTE Advisor-Area I

Blanca A. Rodriguez, CTE Advisor-Area II

Norma L. Quintanilla, CTE Advisor-Area III

Deborah S. Zamora, CTE Counselor at La Joya High School

Rocio Montemayor, CTE Counselor at Juarez-Lincoln High School

Veronica Chapa, CTE Counselor at Palmview High School

La Joya I.S.D.

(956) 323-2283 FAX (956) 323-2281

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Table of Contents

Page

District Philosophy…………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………….. 3 District Mission Statement……………………………………………………………………………………………………….3 Career and Technical Education (CTE) Vision and Mission Statement…………………………………………..3 State Goals for CTE……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………3 Notification of Discrimination…………………………………………………………………………………………………….4 Disclaimer……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. ……………4 CTE Department’s District Web Page……………………………………………………………………………………………. .4 CTE District Improvement Plan (DIP)………………………………………………………………………………………………4 CTE Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS)……………………………………………………………… ………….. .4 CTE Coherent Sequences…………………………………………………………………………………………………. ………….. .5 Career and Technical Education (CTE) Requirements………………………………………………………. ………….. .5 CTE Curriculum Resources……………………………………………………………………………………………………………. .6 “Career Awareness for Tomorrow’s Success” Lessons……………………………………………………… ………….. .6 “Keys to Financial Success” Lessons…………………………………………………………………………………. ………….. .7 CTE Summer Curriculum Alignment for the Law & A/V Academies………………………………………………. .7 CTE Department’s Helpful Links……………………………………………………………………………………………………. .7 Advisory Council………………………………………………………………………………………………………………. ………….. .7 Advisory Council Program Evaluations…………………………………………………………………………………………. .7 Budget Needs Assessment Forms…………………………………………………………………………………………………. .8 Achieve Texas State Initiative………………………………………………………………………………………….. ………….. .8 Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) – Articulated Courses………………………………………………………………9 CATEMA…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………….. 10 Student Industry Certifications………………………………………………………………………………………… ………….. 10 CTE Student Organizations………………………………………………………………………………………………. ………….. 10 CTE School Wide Electives for 9th-12th Grades………………………………………………………………………………. 11 La Joya I.S.D.’s 6 Year Programs of Study…………………………………………………………………………. ………….. 12 La Joya ISD CTE Agriculture Farm Rules……………………………………………………………………………. ………….. 14 CTE AG Farm Housing Contract………………………………………………………………………………………… ………….. 15 Budget – CTE Allotment…………………………………………………………………………………………………… ………….. 16 CTE Coding for PEIMS………………………………………………………………………………………………………. ………….. 16 CTE Program Effectiveness Monitoring……………..…………………………………………………………….. ………….. 16 General Safety Procedures………………………………………………………………………………………………. ………….. 17 Laboratory/Shop Safety Guidelines and Contract…………………………………………………………………………. 21 Kindle Acquisition………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….22 CTE PBMAS Report…..………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 22 RGV Linking Economic & Academic Development (RGV LEAD)……………………………………………………..22 RGV Scholars………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….23 Support Team at The Campus Level (S-TEAM)…………………………………………………………………. ………….. 24 Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary (SCANS) Skills……………………………………………………. 25 Travel Policy Guidelines for Employees and Students………………………………………………………. ………….. 27

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La Joya ISD Career and Technical Education (CTE) Program Procedures Manual

This handbook was developed to provide the district and all educational stake holders with helpful information, resources for policies, procedures and events pertaining to the Career and Technical Education program. The policies stated in the handbook are current but may change within the school year to address program and student needs. Please contact Ruben Trevino, CTE Director at (956) 323-2283 or at r.trevino2@lajoyaisd.net should you have any questions.

DISTRICT PHILOSOPHY La Joya I.S.D. is dedicated to the belief that in order for all students to attain mastery of the instructional goals, there must be a district-wide commitment to constant renewal according to the most effective practices and procedures in the most current research findings. In order to operationalize this philosophy in the most comprehensive and organized manner, the district has adopted the Quality District Model. The district’s Mission Statement, Foundation Beliefs and Desired Student Exit Behaviors: Learner Outcomes exemplify this philosophy.

District Mission Statement

“Educational Excellence: The Right of Every Student”

CTE Vision and Mission Statement Vision: La Joya ISD Career Technical Education Programs will engage every student in high-quality, rigorous and relevant educational pathways and programs developed in partnership with business and industry promoting creativity, innovation, leadership, community service and lifelong learning and allowing students to turn their passions into paychecks — their dreams into careers. Mission: La Joya ISD Career and Technical Education Programs’ mission is to provide industry-linked programs and services that enable all individuals to reach their career goals in order to achieve economic self-sufficiency, compete in the global marketplace and contribute to the nation’s economy prosperity.

State Goals for Career and Technical Education: Each public school student shall master the basic skills and knowledge necessay for: ◊ managing the dual roles of family member and wage earner, ◊ gainining entry level employment in a high-skill, high-wage job or continuing the student’s education at the post secondary level. TEA 29.18

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Notification of Nondiscrimination It is the policy of La Joya ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, or handicap in its vocational programs, services, or activities as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended; Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972; and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. It is the policy of La Joya ISD not to discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, sex, handicap, or age in its employment practices as required by Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, as amended: and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended. La Joya I.S.D. will take steps to assure that lack of English language skills will not be a barrier to admission and participation in all education and vocational programs. For information about your rights or grievance procedures, contact the Executive Director for Student Services, Ms. Marina Abdullah at 201 E. Expwy. 83 La Joya, Texas 78560, (956) 323-2688 , and/or the Section 504 Coordinator, Mrs. Rosa M. Romo at 201 E. Expressway 83, La Joya, TX 78560, (956)323- 2653.

DISCLAIMER This CTE Procedures Manual provides counselors a general guideline to use when enrolling students into a CTE coherence sequence of courses for a particular pathway. It contains information on all pathways available to students in La Joya ISD; however, the La Joya ISD cannot guarantee that all sequence of courses will be available at all high schools and they may vary. Some courses may not get sufficient student requests to assure that the course will be offered. Additionally, some courses may require unique skills and training on the part of the teacher and sometimes the school is not able to provide a teacher who is prepared to teach a unique course. Nevertheless, our school district is committed to make every effort to provide the courses needed for the success of our students.

CTE Department’s District Web Page Visit La Joya I.S.D.’s CTE Department’s District Web Page at http://www.lajoyaisd.com/dept/CandI/CTE/index.php

CTE District Improvement Plan (DIP) The district’s CTE Department’s District Improvement Plan is available by clicking on the following link: http://www.lajoyaisd.com:35020/dept/CandI/CTE/docs/2013- 2014/CTE%20DIP%202013-2014.pdf

CTE Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) Chapter 127 Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Career Development (PDF, 50KB) Chapter 130 Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Career and Technical Education (PDF, 2.5MB)

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For more information on the TEKS for CTE, click on the following link: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=4881&menu_id=720

CTE Coherent Sequences In May 2007, the 80th Texas Legislature passed HB 3485, requiring the State Board of Education (SBOE) by rule to revise the essential knowledge and skills for career and technical education not later than Sept. 1, 2009.

The SBOE appointed writing teams to make recommendations for revisions to the CTE Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). Writing teams began work in the Spring 2008 to review the current CTE TEKS and make recommendations for revisions. Recommendations for revision of the TEKS were adopted by the SBOE at the July 2009 meeting.

A recommended course sequence and a text equivalent description of the recommended course sequence for each cluster may be accessed using the links below. For more information on the CTE Coherent Sequences, click on the following link: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=5415

Career and Technical Education (CTE) Requirements Teacher certification standards and Texas Examinations of Educator Standards (TExES) exams have been developed and implemented for Career and Technical Education (CTE) program areas.

 CTE certification Chart

 Specific Requirements for Certificates Based on Experience and Preparation in Skill Areas

Work Experience, Licensure and Degree Information

 Three program areas require related work experience for certification and completion of an educator preparation program: o Trade and Industrial Education (TIE) o Health Science Technology Education (HSTE) o Initial Marketing Education (MED)

 TIE and HSTE also require professional licensure or certification within the field to be taught.

 All certifications, except the Trade and Industrial Education (TIE), require at least a bachelor’s degree.

 Marketing Education 8-12 may be added through Certification by Examination for Texas educators who hold a current valid classroom teaching certificate (PDF 66.07, KB) classroom teaching certificate and verified work experience.

For more information on CTE Requirements, click on the following link: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=5351&menu_id=865&menu_id2=794

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CTE Curriculum Resources The following universities provide curriculum support for the 16 career and technical education clusters. Their sites are not maintained by TEA. The links are provided as a service to the public. The Agency takes no responsibility for difficulties which may result from the use of any website listed herein.

Texas A&M University

 Agriculture, Food & Natural Resources

 Transportation, Distribution & Logistics Stephen F. Austin State University

 Education & Training

 Hospitality & Tourism

 Human Services University of North Texas

 Architecture & Construction

 Arts, A/V Technology & Communications

 Business Management & AdministrationFinance

 Government & Public Administration

 Health Science

 Information Technology

 Law, Public Safety,Corrections & Security

 Manufacturing

 Marketing

 Science, Technology, Engineering & Mathematics To access the CTE Curriculum Resources, click on the following links: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index4.aspx?id=4274 or http://www.lajoyaisd.com:35020/dept/CandI/CTE/docs/2013-2014/2012- 2013%20CTE%20HELPFUL%20LINKS.pdf

“Career Awareness for Tomorrow’s Success” Lessons The district’s CTE Department provides these “Career Awareness for Tomorrow’s Success” Lessons to teachers and counselors in the PreK through 12 Grades in order to comply with state and federal regulations. These lessons provide a college and career awareness which will help prepare our students for their future. These “Career Awareness for Tomorrow’s Success” Lessons can be accessed by clicking on the following link: http://www.lajoyaisd.com/dept/CandI/CTE/careerawareness.php

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“Keys to Financial Success” Lessons These “Keys to Financial Success” Lessons will teach students that financial literacy means more than just learning to balance a checkbook or keep a savings account. It includes a way to relay information about retirement planning, pensions, housing and more. This teacher/counselor resource includes the script, printable posters and guided questions and discussion. Five recent graduates of Cab Calloway School for the Arts invented the comic characters, Money Man, Lady Finance and Mr. Responsibility, to help students learn about goals and decision-making, budgeting, saving and investing, risk protection and more.

These “Keys to Financial Success” Program posters fulfilled the request to help Delaware students leave high school financially literate by addressing the following nine themes: Goals and Decision Making; Learn More, Earn More; Budgeting-Spending & Saving; Saving and Investing; Credit; Financial Products, Services and Mechanics; Housing; Transportation; Risk Protection (e.g. Identity Theft, Phishing, Fraud, etc.) To access the “Keys to Financial Success Lessons”, click on the following link: http://www.lajoyaisd.com/dept/CandI/CTE/financialsuccess.php

CTE Summer Curriculum Alignment for the Law & A/V Academies During the Summer of 2013, four CTE teachers and three core area teachers worked on alignment CTE and Core Area Curriculum for the Law and A/V Academies. The completed CTE Summer Curriculum Alignment is available in the following link: http://www.lajoyaisd.com/dept/CandI/CTE/summercurriculum.php

CTE Department’s Helpful Links For more information on the CTE Department’s Helpful Links, click on: http://www.lajoyaisd.com:35020/dept/CandI/CTE/docs/2013-2014/2012- 2013%20CTE%20HELPFUL%20LINKS.pdf

Advisory Council The La Joya ISD CTE Advisory committees are made up of Campus Administrators, Counselors, teachers, industry Partners and student. They are an integral part of our Career and Technical Education Programs. Industry members are selected for their expertise in their industry and for their commitment to education.

Advisory Council Program Evaluations The La Joya ISD Career and Technical Education Program requires that CTE Teachers conduct a yearly program evaluation of their career course in conjunction with their Advisory Council members in order to evaluate their current practices and to seek teaching and learning skills that will impact student achievement.

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The CTE Advisory Council Program Evaluations are available in PDF Format on the following link: http://www.lajoyaisd.com/dept/CandI/CTE/CTE%20Evaluations.php

Budget Needs Assessment Forms Budget Needs Assessment Forms must be completed by each CTE teacher based on the Advisory Council Program Evaluations. This form will help plan the budget for the following school year and is available on the following link: http://www.lajoyaisd.com/dept/CandI/CTE/docs/2013- 2014/Budget%20Needs%20Assessment%20Form%20-%20Equipment%20Needs.pdf

Achieve Texas Initiative Achieve Texas is designed to help students (and their parents) make wise education choices. It is based on the belief that the curricula of the 21st century should combine rigorous academics with relevant career education. When schools integrate academic and technical education, students can see the “usefulness” of what they are learning. The system also facilitates a seamless transition from secondary to postsecondary opportunities. Achieve Texas uses the sixteen federally defined Career Clusters of the States’ Career Clusters initiative ( www.careerclusters.org ) as the foundation for restructuring how schools arrange their instructional programs. A Career Cluster is a grouping of occupations and broad industries based on commonalities. The sixteen Career Clusters provide an organizing tool for schools, small learning communities, academies, and magnet schools. Programs of Study (POS) have been developed for each of the Career Clusters. The POS represent a recommended sequence of coursework based on a student’s interest or career goal.

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Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) – Articulated Courses The Statewide Articulation Program is an advanced placement program for students interested in preparing for college and a technical career that requires postsecondary education. Statewide Articulation is one way students can earn college credit while in high school. Students who take content-enhanced, articulated career and technical courses for high school credit may also be eligible for college credit at community and technical colleges statewide. High school juniors and seniors who earn a grade of 3.0 (B) or better may count SWAP courses as advanced measures for the Distinguished Achievement Graduation Plan. The following courses at the La Joya ISD are presently articulated with South Texas College in McAllen, Texas and Texas State Technical College in Harlingen, Texas: Health Science Technology Business, Management, and Administration Principles of Health Science Business Information Management I and II Health Science Marketing Dynamics Business Law Medical Terminology Global Business Anatomy and Physiology Business Management Principles of Business, Marketing and Finance Law, Public Safety, Corrections and Security Information Technology Principles of Law, Public Safety, Corrections Principles of Information Technology and Security Telecommunications & Networking Court Systems and Practices Computer Technician Law Enforcement 1 Computer Maintenance Web Technology Hospitality and Tourism Digital and Interactive Media Culinary Arts Human Services Finance Child Development Accounting 1 Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness Child Guidance (2 Period Class Only) Agriculture Science Technology Interior Design Equine Science Agricultural Mechanics and Metal Technology Arts, A/V Technology & Communications Agricultural Power Systems Advanced Audio Video Production Manufacturing Animation Advanced Welding Advanced Animation Marketing Architecture and Construction Marketing Dynamics Principles of Architecture and Construction Entrepreneurship Advanced Architecture and Construction STEM Transportation, Distribution & Logistics Engineering Design & Presentation Advanced Automotive Technology

Disclaimer: ATC –Articulation is given upon Teacher completion of the ATC Certification(s).

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For more information on Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) – Articulated Courses, click on the following link: https://www.atctexas.org/

CATEMA The CATEMA™ system is an online student registration and tracking program. Career and Technical Education, Tech-Prep, or any other educational programs can track their schools, teachers, students, courses, and credits. Participating colleges can access the CATEMA™ system to verify credit recommendations from the student’s high school teacher, and view the student’s history of courses in the system. CATEMA TIMELINE: September – Enroll Class and Students in CATEMA November – Submit Roster (CATEMA) to CTE OFFICE December – Enter Final Grade if ½ Semester Course May – Enter Final Grade for Year May – Send Final Roster with Grade to CTE Office For more information on CATEMA, click on the following link: http://techpreprgv.com/online- registration.html

Student Industry Certifications Industry Certification is a process of program evaluation ensuring that individual programs meet industry standards in the areas of curriculum, teacher qualification, lab specifications, equipment, and industry involvement. Career and Technical Education Teacher Certifications issued by the Texas Education Agency that correspond to the career clusters may be found at www.tea.state.tx.us .

CTE Student Organizations (CTSOs)

Distributive Education Clubs of America

Health Occupations Students of America

SkillsUSA: Champions at Work

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Family, Career and Community Leaders Future Farmers of America Of America For more information on CTSOs, click on the following link: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=3369

CTE School Wide Electives for 9th-12th Grades Principles of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources *Advanced Animal Science **Ag. Mechanics & Metal Technologies

**Equine Science

Veterinary Medical Applications

Livestock Production

**Interior Design

Professional Communications (Credit for Speech)

**Business Information Management I & II

**Global Business

**Business Management

Dollars & Sense

**Web Technology

**Telecommunications and Networking

**Computer Technician

**Computer Maintenance

**Digital & Interactive Media

Fashion Design

Child Development

*Forensic Science

*Food Science

**Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness

**Child Development

Cosmetology I & II

Welding

**Advanced Welding

**Marketing Dynamics

Concepts of Engineering

**Engineering Design and Presentation

* Statistics & Risk Management

Automotive Technology I

**Advanced Automotive Technology

Principles of Transportation, Distribution, and Logistics

*4th Credit for Science or Math (11th & 12th Grades)

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**Advanced Technical Credit (ATC) – Articulated Courses

***CTE courses that offer Student Industry Certifications

La Joya I.S.D.’s 6 Year Graduation Programs of Study La Joya I.S.D. offers the following Six Year Graduation Programs of Study:

1. Business Administration-Accounting Specialization………………………………………….

2. Business Administration-Banking Specialization……………………………………………………

3. Automotive Technology ……………………………………………………………………………………

4. Business Administration-Import/Export/Logistics Specialization………………………….

5. Business Administration-Marketing Specialization……………………………………………….

6. Computer-Aided Drafting & Design-Architectural Drafting Specialization…………

7. Child Development……………………………………………………………………………………………

8. Business Administration-Diesel Technology………………………………………………………..

9. Electronic & Computer Maint. Tech.-Computer Maintenance Specialization…………

10. Electronic & Computer Maint. Tech.-Computer Support Specialization…………………

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La Joya I.S.D.’s 6 Year Programs of Study La Joya I.S.D. offers the following Six Year Graduation Programs of Study:

11. Health Information Technology……………………………………………………………………….

12. Heating, Ventilation, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology………………

13. Office Management…………………………………………………………………………………

14. Precision Manufacturing………………………………………………………………………………

15. Plan: Business Computer Systems-Computer Specialist Specialization………….

16. Business Computer Systems-Networking Specialist Specialization ………………………..

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La Joya ISD CTE Agriculture Farm Rules The intention of this contract is to standardize the rules and regulations concerning livestock housing at the La Joya ISD Agriculture Farms in a written agreement. This is an endorsement of the student, their parent/guardian, and the La Joya FFA Chapter Advisors. Raising a livestock project is a privilege and all students must adhere to the rules and regulations set forth and hereby listed.

RULES AND REGULATIONS 1. Animals are to be fed properly twice a day, unless instructed differently by the Agriculture

Science Teacher(s) (IF AN ANIMAL IS NOT BEING FED YOU’LL BE FORCED TO REMOVE YOUR ANIMAL FROM THE FARM.)

2. Students will feed in the morning between 6:30-8:00 a.m. and in the afternoon by 4:30 p.m. and no later than 7:00 p.m. (Everyday, including weekends).

3. Everyone will be responsible for keeping all gates closed at all times. You will be held responsible if any type of accident occurs if gates are left open. Please adhere to this rule as it is the most important one on this paper. (PLEASE BE RESPONSIBLE) ALL STUDENTS MUST LEAVE THE AG-FARM BY 8:00 P.M. – UNLESS UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF THE AG. TEACHER(S)

4. Animals should be given fresh clean water daily. 5. Pens will be assigned to the students, and he/she will be responsible in ensuring that it is kept

clean. It must be cleaned daily and the manure must be placed in the area assigned by the Agriculture Teacher(s).

6. The buildings, alleys and common areas are everyone’s responsibility. Litter and debris needs to be picked up and placed in the trash cans.

7. All animals must be exercised daily as instructed by the Ag. Teacher(s). Student must make sure to use assigned exercise area.

8. Students may use the feed rooms that are on the school farm. These feed rooms must be kept clean.

9. There will be no loitering or horseplay on the La Joya ISD Ag. Farms. 10. No animals will be left unattended in the show arena. 11. Once a student takes possession of his/her animal, it is their responsibility to follow the rules

and regulations mentioned. Disciplinary action will be taken if these rules and regulations are not followed.

12. If a student notices something unusual about his/her animal, it is his/her responsibility to inform the Agriculture Science Teacher(s).

13. The Ag. Farm is the property of the La Joya ISD and all rules and regulations of the school district apply. For example, NO tobacco products of any kind, No alcoholic beverages or illegal substances, etc. will be allowed at anytime from the students, parents and/or visitors. Violations of any rules and regulations brought to your attention will either be verbally or written by the Agriculture Science Teacher(s) may result in disciplinary action.

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CTE AG FARM HOUSING CONTRACT

LA JOYA ISD AG FARM HOUSING CONTRACT

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF LIVESTOCK PROJECT AND PEN ASSIGNEMENT

DISCIPLINARY ACTION

Disciplinary action will be readily used to maintain a quality-learning environment and to maintain the integrity of the La Joya ISD FFA Chapters at the Agriculture Science Farms. First offense, against the Ag Farm rules and regulations will include a verbal reprimand with documentation which will be forwarded to the student’s principal. If the student continues to be a discipline problem a meeting will be scheduled between the student, his/her parent/legal guardian, the Agriculture Science Teacher (s) and the principal for the possibility of losing all Agriculture Farm privileges. Any offenses that are against school district rules and regulations will result in immediate loss of Ag Farm privileges and disciplinary action will be determined by the campus principal. I AGREE TO FOLLOW AND ABIDE BY THE ABOVE STATED RULES AND REGULATIONS. _________________________________________________ __________________ Student Date _________________________________________________ __________________ Parent/Legal Guardian Date

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Budget – CTE Allotment

Under the Texas Education Code (TEC), §42.154, a school district is eligible to receive weighted funding for each eligible full-time equivalent (FTE) student in average daily attendance (ADA) in an approved CTE program. In addition to this weighted funding, a school district is also eligible to receive a flat amount of $50 for each FTE student enrolled in two or more advanced CTE courses for three or more credits or an advanced CTE course as part of a tech-prep program. Together, these funding elements make up the district’s total CTE allotment. The allotment applies to students in grades 9–12 enrolled in CTE programs or students in grades 7–12 who have disabilities and are enrolled in CTE for the Disabled (CTED) programs. La Joya ISD also applies for the Carl D. Perkins Formula Grant for the CTE program that offers

coherent sequences of CTE courses.

For more information on CTE Allotment, click on the following link:

http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=2147487143

CTE Coding for the Public Education Information Management System (PEIMS) Description of Student’s CTE Participation Code to be used on PEIMS 101 Record

Not enrolled in a CTE Course 0

Enrolled in one CTE Course 1

CTE coherent sequence taker 2

Tech-Prep program participant 3

Please reference the La Joya ISD CTE Coding and Resources Tech Prep Texas Scholar 2011-2012

document.

CTE Program Effectiveness Monitoring The Division of Program Monitoring and Interventions (PMI) develops and implements intervention processes for career and technical education (CTE) programs statewide that promote program effectiveness and improved student performance, and monitor compliance with requirements for students served. For more information on CTE Program Effectiveness Monitoring, click on the following link: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=2147495611&menu_id=2147483703&menu_id2=2147483709

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General Safety Procedures Responsibility Statement: All La Joya Independent School District employees are to perform all duties assigned in a safe manner to avoid injury to one and or to others. Please refer to the La Joya ISD Risk Management Department Standard Operating Procedures for more details.

2.1 Personal Protective Equipment The District shall provide and replace required personal protective attire/equipment as needed. PPE must fit correctly. Wear PPE which cannot become snarled in machinery; afford adequate skin protection; and does not reduce vision or hearing. Employee is expected to inspect PPE: clean them after every use; disinfect if necessary; and store them.

 HEAD PROTECTION

o A hard hat is one of the easiest types of protection to use

o Wear a hard hat wherever there is danger of injury from falling or flying objects;

potential for bumping your head against overhead structures or moving equipment.

o Adjust the headband so there is space between hat and head to absorb shock.

o Don’t wear a hard hat over a hat. It won’t fit right.

o Class A hard hats protect against impact and penetration, are water-resistant, and slow

to burn.

o Class B hard hat are used in situations with electrical hazards.

o Hard hats will last longer if they are not stored in sun or high heat.

 EYES AND FACE PROTECTION

o Eyes need protection from a variety of workplace hazards. Choose eyewear that

protects against the greatest possible hazard level.

o Flying objects, chips, or particles: Safety goggles/spectacles with side protection

o Splashes from chemicals: Safety goggles

o Dust, fumes, mists, gases, and vapors: Tight-fitting chemical goggles

o Splashes or splatters: Goggles or face shield

o Hot sparks or splashes: Goggles or spectacles with side protection

o Radian energy: Welding goggles with special lenses to filter out the harmful light or

radiation

o Electrical exposure: Do not wear metal eyewear, which could conduct electricity

o Any very serious eye hazard: Face shield over safety spectacles or goggles

o If your eyes are splashed or injured by a chemical splash; flush with water for at least

15 minutes. If a particle is in your eye; blink to try to get it out, if you can’t, close and

cover the eye and see a doctor. If object hit the eye; see a doctor immediately.

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o Mechanics must wear goggles when working under vehicles. If you wear prescription

eyewear and need eye protection, you MUST use either: Protective eyewear that

has the prescription or safety goggles over prescription glasses. Note: You should not

wear contact lenses in areas with dust and/or chemicals.

 HAND PROTECTION

o Always leave machine guards in place.

o Do not wear gloves, loose cuffs, rings, watches, jewelry while working with

machinery.

o Use a push stick, not your hands, to feed materials into moving machinery.

o Keep hands away from moving machine parts.

o Always cut away from your body.

o Use brushes, not hands, to sweep up metal or wood chips.

o When stacking materials separated by spacers, keep your fingers on the sides, not

the top or bottom, of the spacers.

o Bandage any minor cuts or scrapes before putting on gloves.

Note: Gloves must be used when treating injuries and cleaning areas that involve

contact with blood or other body fluids. Hypoallergenic gloves or similar alternatives

are readily available to employees with allergic problems.

 GLOVE’S MATERIAL o Heat or cold usually calls for insulated gloves. o Electricity requires special rubber gloves with insulated liners. o Sharp objects should be handled by people wearing cut resistant gloves (metal

mesh). o Rough surfaces call for leather gloves. o Corrosive substances need gloves made of neoprene or nitrile rubber. o Slippery objects should be handled by workers wearing gloves made of cotton or

fabrics. o Chemicals need a material that does not react in a dangerous way with that

chemical.

 FOOT PROTECTION o Always wear sturdy shoes with nonskid soles. o Do not wear sandals, high heels or opened toe shoes in shops, labs, cafeterias, or

other places where foot injuries can occur. o Welding sparks or hot metal splashes are a hazard that can be offset by wearing

easy-to-remove “gaiters” that don’t have any laces or eyelets that could trap splashes or sparks. In addition, wear pants outside the boots instead of tucked in

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 EAR PROTECTION

o Various actions can reduce noise when it reaches 85 decibels or more.

o The most common types of hearing protection are:

 ear plugs

 canal caps

 ear muffs

 RESPIRATORY PROTECTION

o Wear respirators when you have to work in situations where airborne hazards

cannot be reduced to a safe level by ventilation.

o When you have to work in hazardous atmospheres, be sure your respirator is

designed to protect against the type and form of contaminant in your work area.

o Check that it has all its parts and that they’re in good condition. Then clean,

disinfect, and store it properly.

2.2 LIFTING AND MATERIAL HANDLING SAFETY Material handling whether done manually or with mechanical equipment, is a major source of occupational injuries. These injuries are not limited to the shipping department or warehouse. These injuries are caused primarily by unsafe conditions and habits: improper lifting techniques, carrying too heavy objects, incorrect gripping, back and leg positioning, etc.

 LIFTING TECHNIQUES

o Plan the task and know your lifting limits. o Check the area for tripping and/or stumbling hazards. o Be sure the load is not too heavy for one person. Get help for heavy loads. o Properly adjust lift belts or back braces, if provided. o Stand as close as possible to the object while lifting and carrying. o Keep your body balanced and your back straight. o Place one foot beside the object and the other foot slightly behind the object to

increase your balance and stability. o Get a firm grip on the object. Use your entire hand for grasping the object, not just the

tips of your fingers. Keep hands free of oil and grease. o Lift gradually, without jerking, to minimize the effect of acceleration. o Lift with your legs, keeping your back as straight as possible, and your chin tucked in. o Do not twist your back while lifting. o Do not lift or lower with the arms extended. o Avoid lifting above your shoulders and below your knees. o Follow the same procedure when lowering the load. o When two people handle a box, carton, or crate, it is preferable that they be nearly the

same size, this makes the job easier and keeps the load balanced.

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o The two should lift at the same time, on an agreed signal. o They must be able to see in the direction they are walking and be aware of pedestrians,

machines, walls, and floors. o Long objects, like ladders, lumber, or pipe, should be carried over the shoulder. o The front end should be held as high as possible to prevent its striking other employees. o When two or more people carry an object, they should place it on the same shoulder,

and walk in step

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LABORATORY/SHOP SAFETY GUIDELINES AND CONTRACT Rules for a safe laboratory/shop environment: Eating, drinking, and the application of cosmetics is strictly prohibited in ALL CTE classrooms unless part of instruction (i.e., Lifetime Nutrition & Wellness).

A. Open toed shoes are not permitted in shop areas. B. All personal belongings (books, purses, and backpacks) must be kept away from the work

surface. C. Tie back long hair in all laboratory/shop activities. D. Keep hands away from the face at all times E. Gloves and goggles must be worn whenever students are working with biohazards, toxic

materials and heavy electrical equipment. F. If gloves become soiled, change immediately. G. Always wash hands after removing gloves. H. DO NOT put pencils or pens in the mouth while working with microorganisms. I. Cover and protect exposed wounds. J. Laboratory coats or aprons should be worn at all times during laboratory investigations. K. Locate all fire extinguishers in the laboratory and shop classes. L. Locate the eyewash station. If a sink is used as an eyewash station, always use cold water to

flush the eyes. M. Disinfect the work space before and after each investigation. N. Handle all biohazards, toxic materials and heavy equipment with care. O. Notify the instructor immediately of any spills or accidents. P. Place all materials, supplies and equipment in the appropriate place. Q. Biohazards and toxic materials must NEVER leave the laboratory or shops. R. If there is a fire drill, turn off all flames and electrical equipment, if possible, and exit in an

orderly fashion. (follow school procedures) S. Never use any equipment unless you have been trained to use it, and have passed the required

safety test. T. Do not use shop/lab equipment if instructor is not present. Substitutes do not replace the

instructor.

I have read and agree to follow the above safety guidelines. I agree to report any accident or injury to the instructor immediately. I will never use any equipment or supplies without obtaining permission from the instructor.

___________________________ _____________________________ ______________

Print Student name Student Signature Date

I have read and reviewed the above guidelines with my child.

___________________________ _____________________________ ______________

Print Parent name Parent Signature Date

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Kindle Acquisition The La Joya ISD’S CTE Department purchased seven Kindles per high school campus for teacher and student use. The Kindle electronic book is the digital version of a conventional, printed book. It’s a portable device that allows the user to download literally thousands of books, magazines, newspapers, audio files and other reading materials via free-of-charge wireless connectivity. Simple to use, the Kindle has features that will save users time, space and money. Books and subscriptions are half the price of most hardcover books, and it’s waste-free. The CTE Kindles have 130 books loaded on them. Twenty of them are AR books. The books that are loaded are recommended for secondary student reading with a reading level from 5.0- 12.0 grades and represent fiction novels that are typically read at the high school level. Current research by Princeton University on “Kindles in the Classroom” indicates that the Kindles can be used a technology tool that optimizes teaching and learning by creating engaging lessons that promote critical reading and writing skills. The Kindles can be loaded with an abundance of books that a student may not have access to through his/her library.

CTE PBMAS Report The CTE PBMAS Report for 2013 is included in the Procedures Manual for the district’s Curriculum and Evaluation Department. TEA monitoring and intervention activities focus on a data-driven and performance-based system that takes place in a continuous improvement model. Activities reflect an emphasis on data integrity, data analysis, needs assessment, improvement planning, implementation, monitoring, progress reporting, and improved student performance and program effectiveness. The system for TEA monitoring is referenced as the Performance-Based Monitoring (PBM) system. The PBM system reflects the use of integrated interventions based on Local Education Agency (LEA) performance as evidenced by the Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System (PBMAS) indicators. Results on each PBMAS indicator and patterns across indicators were examined to determine required levels of intervention. For more information on the CTE Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System (PBMAS), click on the following link: http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=2147495611&menu_id=2147483703&menu_id2=2 147483709

RGV Linking Economic & Academic Development (RGV LEAD) RGV LEAD is a partnership between education and business that prepares young people for today’s skilled workforce. This partnership involves high schools, colleges and universities, large and small businesses, governmental agencies — all working together! For more information on RGV LEAD, click on the following link: http://techpreprgv.com/

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RGV Scholars RGV Scholars is a recognition program in collaboration with the Texas Business and Education Coalition, to encourage students to enroll in, and complete, Tech Prep programs.

TECH PREP TEXAS SCHOLARS REQUIREMENT

RGV LEAD SCHOLARS REQUIREMENTS FOR 2014-2015

Requirements for the Class of 2014 Students in Grades 10, 11, and 12 Students in Grade 9

Complete all courses required by the Recommended High School Program or the Distinguished Achievement Program

EITHER: Complete all courses required by the Recommended High School Program or the Distinguished Achievement Program OR: Complete all courses required by the Foundation Program with at least one Endorsement.

Complete all courses required by the Foundation Program with at least one Endorsement.

Complete the high school portion of a six- or eight-year plan of study— that includes, in high school, a coherent sequence of two or more career and technical education courses for 3 of more credits

Complete the high school portion of a six- or eight-year program of study that includes, in high school, a coherent sequence of two or more career and technical education courses for 3 of more credits

Complete the high school portion of a six- or eight-year program of study that includes, in high school, a coherent sequence of two or more career and technical education courses for 3 of more credits

Complete at least two college-level Tech Prep courses as part of the high school graduation plan. Each “college-level Tech Prep course” must meet all of the following requirements:

 Must be a career and technical education course taken in high school

 Must be either an articulated course for which the student has earned a grade of 80 or better or a dual-credit course for which the student has earned a passing grade

 Must be a course that is included in a Tech Prep program of study plan at one of the following local colleges: South Texas college, Texas State Technical College Harlingen,

Complete at least two college- level courses as part of the high school graduation plan. Each “college-level course” must meet all of the following requirements:

 Must be a career and technical education course taken for high school credit.

 Must be either an articulated course for which the student has earned a grade of 80 or better or a dual-credit course for which the student has earned a passing grade

 Must be a course that is included in a college- and-career-focused program of study graduation plan.

Complete at least two college- level courses as part of the high school graduation plan. Each “college-level course” must meet all of the following requirements:

 Must be a career and technical education course taken for high school credit.

 Must be either an articulated course for which the student has earned a grade of 80 or better or a dual-credit course for which the student has earned a passing grade

 Must be a course that is included in a college- and-career-focused program of study graduation plan.

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Texas Southmost College, or another college that offers Tech Prep programs not available in the Valley (see note in brochure)

Complete a declaration of intent to be a Tech Prep Texas Scholar

Complete a declaration of intent to be an RGV LEAD Scholar

Complete a declaration of intent to be an RGV LEAD Scholar

For more information on Tech Prep Texas Scholars, click on the following link: http://techpreprgv.com/students/texasscholars.html

Support Team at the Campus Level (S-TEAM) An S-TEAM is a campus-based support team whose mission is to improve student scheduling, enhance career counseling for students and parents, facilitate ongoing communication between employers and educators, act as a liaison team working with the campus site-based decision-making team, and expedite implementation of Tech Prep strategies and methodologies at the campus level. Privilege! If you have been chosen to be an S-TEAM member, it means you have been recognized as one of the best and most caring educators in your school. Because of this, you will be given the privilege of learning from and interacting with, some of the most exciting leaders and innovators in education today.

Commitment! Participating in an S-TEAM takes time and energy. It is important to think carefully about the commitment you are making by signing up. Part of the S-TEAM concept is “sticking with the program” long enough to effect real change in our overall educational process. This means being willing to learn, and change yourself, which, as we all know, can be exciting as well as painful. The joy of seeing students regain a passion for learning as they begin connecting the relevance of what they are learning to their future is a sweet reward.

Challenge! As an S-TEAM member, you will be inspired to think and act in new ways. As educators, if we think the same old thing, and do the same old thing, we will get the same old result. Tech Prep is here to hold the door open to fresh, practical, creative approaches to education for those who are willing to take the challenge. For more information on S-TEAMs, click on the following link: http://techpreprgv.com/educators/s-teams.html

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Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS Skills) The Secretary’s Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills (SCANS) was appointed by the Secretary of Labor to determine the skills our young people need to succeed in the world of work. The Commission’s fundamental purpose is to encourage a high-performance economy characterized by high-skill, high-wage employment.

The primary objective is to help teachers understand how curriculum and instruction must change to enable students to develop those high performance skills needed to succeed in the high performance workplace.

SCANS has focused on one important aspect of schooling: what they called “learning a living” system. In 1991, they issued their initial report, What Work Requires of Schools. As outlined in that report, a high-performance workplace requires workers who have a solid foundation in the basic literacy and computational skills, in the thinking skills necessary to put knowledge to work, and in the personal qualities that make workers dedicated and trustworthy.

High-performance workplaces also require other competencies: the ability to manage resources, to work amicably and productively with others, to acquire and use information, to master complex systems, and to work with a variety of technologies.

This document outlines both these “fundamental skills” and “workplace competencies” A Three-Part Foundation Basic Skills: Reads, writes, performs arithmetic and mathematical operations, listens and speaks A. Reading–locates, understands, and interprets written information in prose and in documents such as manuals, graphs, and schedules B. Writing–communicates thoughts, ideas, information, and messages in writing; and creates documents such as letters, directions, manuals, reports, graphs, and flow charts C. Arithmetic/Mathematics–performs basic computations and approaches practical problems by choosing appropriately from a variety of mathematical techniques D. Listening–receives, attends to, interprets, and responds to verbal messages and other cues E. Speaking–organizes ideas and communicates orally

Thinking Skills: Thinks creatively, makes decisions, solves problems, visualizes, knows how to learn, and reasons A. Creative Thinking–generates new ideas B. Decision Making–specifies goals and constraints, generates alternatives, considers risks, and evaluates and chooses best alternative C. Problem Solving–recognizes problems and devises and implements plan of action D. Seeing Things in the Mind’s Eye–organizes, and processes symbols, pictures, graphs, objects, and other information E. Knowing How to Learn–uses efficient learning techniques to acquire and apply new knowledge and skills

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F. Reasoning–discovers a rule or principle underlying the relationship between two or objects and applies it when solving a problem Personal Qualities: Displays responsibility, self-esteem, sociability, self-management, and integrity and honesty A. Responsibility–exerts a high level of effort and perseveres towards goal attainment B. Self-Esteem–believes in own self-worth and maintains a positive view of self C. Sociability-demonstrates understanding, friendliness, adaptability, empathy, and D. Self-Management–assesses self accurately, sets personal goals, monitors progress, and exhibits self-control E. Integrity/Honesty–chooses ethical courses of action

Five Workplace Competencies Resources: Identifies, organizes, plans, and allocates resources

A. Time–Selects goal-relevant activities, ranks them, allocates time, and prepares and follows schedules

B. Money–Uses or prepares budgets, makes forecasts, keeps records, and makes adjustments to meet objectives

C. Material and Facilities–Acquires, stores, allocates, and uses materials or space efficiently D. Human Resources–Assesses skills and distributes work accordingly, evaluates performance and provides feedback

Interpersonal: Works with others A. Participates as Member of a Team–contributes to group effort B. Teaches Others New Skills C. Serves Clients/Customers–works to satisfy customers’ expectations D. Exercises Leadership–communicates ideas to justify position, persuades and convinces others, responsibly challenges existing procedures and policies E. Negotiates–works toward agreements involving exchange of resources, resolves divergent interests F. Works with Diversity–works well with men and women from diverse backgrounds

Information: Acquires and uses information A. Acquires and Evaluates Information B. Organizes and Maintains Information C. Interprets and Communicates Information D. Uses Computers to Process Information

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Systems: Understands complex inter-relationships

A. Understands Systems–knows how social, organizational, and technological systems work and operates effectively with them

B. Monitors and Corrects Performance–distinguishes trends, predicts impacts on systems operations, diagnoses deviations in systems’ performance and corrects malfunctions

C. Improves or Designs Systems–suggests modifications to existing systems and develops new or alternative systems to improve performance

Technology: Works with a variety of technologies

A. Selects Technology–chooses procedures, tools or equipment including computers and related technologies

B. Applies Technology to Task–Understands overall intent and proper procedures for setup and operation of equipment

C. Maintains and Troubleshoots Equipment–Prevents, identifies, or solves problems with equipment, including computers and other technologies

For more information on the SCANS Skills, click on the following link: http://wdr.doleta.gov/SCANS/

Travel Policy Guidelines for Employees and Students The Travel Policy Guidelines for Employees are included in the following link: http://www.lajoyaisd.com:35020/dept/admfin/busfin/files/2013-

2014/EMPLOYEE%20TRAVEL%20%2008-19-2013.pdf

The Travel Policy Guidelines for Students are included in the following link: http://www.lajoyaisd.com:35020/dept/HRandSS/SS/docs/2013- 14/Student%20Travel%20Guidelines.pdf


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