HOMELESS MEN AND WOMEN AND THE DIFFERENCE 2

HOMELESS MEN AND WOMEN AND THE DIFFERENCE 2

Running head: HOMELESS MEN AND WOMEN AND THE DIFFERENCE 1

HOMELESS MEN AND WOMEN AND THE DIFFERENCE 2

Each Section Needs to be longer almost double of what it is, 20 – 25 peer reviewed references required, each section needs 3 or more citations

Homeless Men and Women and the Difference

Name

Course

Date

Table of Contents Page

Table of Figures …………………………………………………………………………..3

Abstract ……………………………………………………………………………………4

Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………….5

Problem Statement ………………………………………………………………………..5

Research Question …………………………………………………………………………6

Significance of the Study ………………………………………………………………….6

Definition of Terms ………………………………………………………………………..6

Limitations …………………………………………………………………………………7

Delimitations (Scope) ………………………………………………………………………7

Assumptions ………………………………………………………………………………..7

Literature Review ………………………………………………………………………….7

Conclusion and Recommendation …………………………………………………………9

References …………………………………………………………………………………..11

Table of Figures Page

Figure 1: The population distribution of homeless men and women…………………………….. 9

Figure 2: Distribution of homeless men and women with problems and mental complication….. 10

Abstract

The homeless population is comprised of more men than women according to research. These families go through a lot just to survive and stay safe. Therefore, this issue is developing to be a major issue among many states as it emerged in more than a century ago and was driven by the great depression in the United States. This has therefore, become a major issue to the government hence the need to conduct the research on this field. Moreover, researchers have often neglected research on the difference between the homeless men and women and this has been a motive to focus this research on the existing gap. The study is expected to help governments, states and organizations to understand and deal with the rising problem of homelessness and in budgeting and delivery of public services.

This study will involve a survey that used instruments such as interviews and observation in collection of data. However, most of the information was obtained through secondary research on peer reviewed sources that were of relevant to the topic of study. Through the secondary research, it was found that men make up most of the homeless population while they also suffered more than the women following a number of favors and services that are only available for the women and not the men. More men also engaged in drug and substance abuse as compared to the number of homeless women who also engaged in the same activities. This was backed up with the research conducted.

The following are some of the recommendations of this study; the society needs to get off the stereotype that men cannot fall victims of domestic violence, that they can’t be homeless with their kids and that men are strong and cannot suffer the many social problems. Also, the society should approach this problem without gender bias so as to fix the problem in all the circumstances. Future research should focus on finding more recommendations.

Introduction

Homeless men and homeless women are very different and in most cases, the homeless population are believed to be more of male than females. According to the latest report by SAHMSA, the homeless population is approximated to comprise 51 percent of single men as single women made up 24 percent while the remaining 23 percent were families which in most cases are single mothers and their children (Quigley & Steven, 2001). The number of homeless men and women in every state sum up to more than ten thousand but it is difficult to tell exactly where these populations are. Due to this factor, it is quite difficult to determine the exact statistics on the level of homelessness with respect to gender and track the homeless population. These people do not want to identify as homeless following the increased risk of them being attacked. In addition, the homeless women prefer not to stay in shelters or anywhere close to men. For their, defense, they tend to dress like men and do whatever it takes to belong. This includes hiding for safety by spending the nights in cars or sleeping during the day so as to stay alert during the night. This presents quite some difference with men.

Problem Statement

Homelessness among both men and women is becoming a big problem in the United States and other parts of the world. This phenomenon emerged as a national issue in the 1870s when many homeless individuals began showing up in urban cities. This problem is as a result of various conditions such as unemployment and laziness that was further driven by the great depression. Moreover, the homeless population often find life harder than other people as they have to deal with problems including health, substance abuse and basic needs. The government also finds it hard to take the homeless away from the streets or providing them with public services. In addition, the two gender, male and female, experience homelessness differently therefore, it is important to conduct a research on this phenomenon. Most researchers have always focused their studies on causes and effects of homelessness with no consideration on the difference between homelessness in men and women. This created a gap in research that this study intends to fill.

Research Question

This research seeks to answer the question “What are the differences between homeless men and women”

Significance of the Study

This research will be significant in a number of ways as follows;

i. It will help governments increase accuracy in budget allocations that pertains to gender.

ii. It helps the government deal with the problem of homelessness of men and women.

iii. It will contribute to the future literature review for further research into the field of homelessness and other related fields.

Definition of Terms

i. Homelessness refers to the condition where an individual or persons lack a fixed, regular and adequate place to reside at night (Quigley & Steven, 2001).

ii. Homeless men refer to male persons that do not have a fixed, adequate and regular place of nighttime residence (Nieto et al., 2008).

iii. Homeless women are the females who live without a fixed, regular and adequate place of residing at night (Nieto et al., 2008).

Limitations

i. Unknown factors or conditions may exist where participants operate that could cause bias on their responses.

ii. The feelings, situations and events of the participants could be questionable.

Delimitations (Scope)

The scope of the study covered homeless persons from all gender, that is, both female and male, within United States of America.

Assumptions

i. The chosen participants are sincerely interested in participating in this research and have no other unknown motives.

ii. The participants are expected to answer research questions candidly and honestly.

Literature Review

Analysis and Synthesis

North & Smith (1993) in their study on homeless men and women, they presented the pivotal difference between homeless women and men. These women, unlike men, mostly had in their custody, young children while the women themselves were also younger than the men (North & Smith, 1993). The women were more likely to belong to a minority group that often depend on welfare. Unlike men, the ladies often have little histories of substance and drug abuse, felony conviction and incarceration. The homeless women population is also heterogeneous and include at least two subgroups that stand a high chance to benefit from intervention programs established so as to address their specific needs and problems (North & Smith, 1994). These are not necessary for homeless men.

Causes of Homelessness

Americans perceive homelessness differently as many people engage in victim-blaming and perceive homelessness to be a result of substance abuse and laziness especially in men. However, research shows that more than thirty percent of the homeless population have a problem of drug and substance abuse. Among this population, the adult men who use drugs are twice as many as the adult women, a ratio that correlates with overall number of female to male homeless population. According to Fischer & Breakey (1991), it is true that homelessness can result from addiction but the problem can’t be corrected by blaming the victims. Instead, it is important to understand the litany of other issues to obtain an understanding on how an individual can make the difference.

Other factors could include unemployment, lack of public support, affordable health care, mental illness (Nieto et al., 2008), teenager evictions, natural disasters and domestic violence among other social complications that come with extreme consequences beyond the control of many people. Apparently, homelessness can also be blamed on poverty. According to Buckner et al. (1993), most of these factors affect more men as compared to women being homeless. Unlike women, homelessness in men also results from misandry. For instance, in the case of veterans, particularly the ones who return from combat duties, most of them are men (Browne, 1993). These men exhibit many complications including mental health crisis, broken families and job replacements, problems that cause extreme conditions like homelessness and in extreme cases suicide. Additionally, the high number of homeless men than women is also exacerbated by the fact that women are streamlined from the system especially when it comes to securing jobs. Also, social services often extend services to first and foremost helping kids. But since most homeless families are made up of single mothers, these women often receive more services compared to single males.

As explained by First et al. (1994), in order to make a difference, the society does not need to consider whether the homeless individual is a woman or a man. Instead, the society should focus on fixing the general economics that include the housing market and unemployment (Quigley & Steven, 2001). This will help deal with the problem rather than passing blames from one person to the other on why their conditions is the way it is.

Conclusions and Recommendations

Conclusion

Figure 1: The population distribution of homeless men and women

image1.emf0

10

20

30

40

50

60

MenWomenFamilies

Percentage (%)

From the study, it was found that 60% of the homeless people were single men, 25% women and 15% families as illustrates in Figure 1 above. Also, the population of homeless men that had mental problems or problem of drug and substance abuse was 70% of the homeless men while women were only 40% of the homeless women as illustrated in figure 2 below. This information corresponds to previous research that concludes that most of the homeless population is made up of men than women and most of the men experience the problem of drug and substance abuse, mental illness and unemployment as compared to the homeless women.

Figure 2: Distribution of homeless men and women with problems and mental complication

Men (%) Women(%)
With problems and mental complications 70 40
Without 30 60

Recommendation

First, the society needs to get off the stereotype that men cannot fall victims of domestic violence, that they can’t be homeless with their kids and that men are strong and cannot suffer the many social problems. Addressing this kind of thinking will be a major step towards rescuing or minimizing the number of homeless men and women across the streets. Lastly, just as explained by First et al. (1994), the society should approach this problem without gender bias so as to fix the problem in all the circumstances.

Recommended Future Research

Due to limited research and resources, this research did not explore all the remedies available for resolving the issue, therefore, there is need for future research in order to determine how the difference in homelessness between men and women can be minimized or eradicated.

References

Browne, A. (1993). Family violence and homelessness: the relevance of trauma histories in the

lives of homeless women. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. 63(3): 370-84.

Buckner, J.C., Zima, BT. & Bassuk, EL. (1993). Mental health issues affecting homeless

women: Implication for intervention. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry. 63(3): 385-99.

First, RJ., Rife, JC. & Toomey, BG. (1994). Homelessness in rural areas: Causes, patterns and

trends. Social Work. 39(1): 97-108.

Fischer, PJ. & Breakey, WR. (1991). The epidemiology of alcohol, drug and mental disorders

among homeless persons. American Journal of Psychology. 46(11): 1115-28.

Nieto, G., Gittelman, M. & Abad, A. (2008). Homeless mentally ill persons: A bibliography

review. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 12(2).

North, C.S. & Smith, E.M. (1993). A comparison of homeless men and women: different

populations, different needs. Community Mental Health Journal. 29(5): 423-431.

North, C.S. & Smith, E.M. (1994). Not all homeless women are alike: effects of motherhood and

the presence of children. Community Mental Health Journal. 30(6): 601-610.

Quigley, J.M. & Steven, R. (2001). The economics of homelessness: The evidence from North

America. European Journal of Housing Policy. 1(3): 323-336.

_1591176739.


Comments are closed.