Modern English Literature

Modern English Literature

ABSURD DRAMA CONVERSATION, Respond to 6 posts IN RELEVANT 5-7 SENTENCES each? Please notate each numerical REMARK with matching numerical RESPONSES? Use quotations when necessary?

Modern English Literature

· Absurd Drama OC15 RESPONd to this quote #1

Absurd drama is defined by works of drama created during the modern era. It is known as absurd because of how boldly it strays away from traditional ideals. Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot is a play well-known for being apart of the “Theatre of the Absurd”. Waiting for Godot is a great example of absurd drama because every element of the play is strange and abnormal. The homelessness and disillusionment is expressed in all aspects of the play; the setting, language, characters, etc. Dictionary.com defines absurd as unreasonable, illogical, and inappropriate. Modern literature expresses a theme of absurdness of culture. Normalcy is no longer a thing and the elements of modernism consists of something disturbing. In Harold Pinter’s The Homecoming is absurd because it exposes dysfunction within the household. It is also absurd to think that the pure and innocent house wife could be a sexually pleasing mistress to many men; nevertheless, make her own money doing so.

The absurd element of modern literature is not only expressed through drama. It is also expressed through poetry. In Dulce et Decorum Est, William Yeats expresses absurdness by poetically confronting the ugly truths about war. He completely goes against the fantasized manifest destiny perspective and uses figurative language to convey a negative image of war; “coughing like hags”, “drunk with fatigue”, “helpless sight”, gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs”. Yeats paints a picture of the modern society to expose the absurdness of the fantasy of war.

· Absurd drama CL13 Respond to this quote #2

Last edited: Tuesday, March 13, 2018 8:36 PM EDT

Absurd drama was mostly written in the 1950’s and 1960’s. The term was first defined as the human situation as basically meaningless and absurd. Whereas traditional theatre attempts to create a photographic representation of life as we see it, the Theatre of the Absurd aims to create a ritual-like, mythological, archetypal, allegorical vision, closely related to the world of dreams. The focal point of these dreams is often man’s fundamental bewilderment and confusion, stemming from the fact that he has no answers to the basic existential questions: why we are alive, why we have to die, why there is injustice and suffering. Waiting for Godot is a great example of this because it embodies so many elements that are included in the definition or characteristics of of an Absurd drama.

· Central Themes in Modern Literature CJ12 Respond to this quote #3

Modern Literature can be best described as being in direct contrast with traditional culture. In Literature, this is displayed in unreliable narrators, non-linear time, a stream of consciousness style, and an overwhelming amount of irony and satire.

· Central themes BT4 Respond to this quote #4

Modern literature began around 1910 and ended in the 1960s. Some significant writers of this period include: Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, T.S. Eliot, William Faulkner, John Steinbeck, E.E. Cummings, Sylvia Plath, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Butler Yeats, Ezra Pound, Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, and Gertrude Stein. Of all writers mentioned above, majority of the writers are discussed in this course.

The theme of absurdity is a central theme in Modern British literature. This theme is shown in a number of readings in the course – Beckett’sWaiting for Godot and Osborne’s Look Back in Anger, for example. Along side this theme, the violence of WW1 is a major theme and influence of the Modern era. We are shown this in Osborne’s Look Back in Anger – specifically Jimmy displays this theme with his unhappy life.

· Themes in Modern Literature VT3 Respond to this quote #5

Throughout the late 1800’s and even up to the mid 1900’s a literary movement, similar to the Renaissance, Romantic, or Victorian literary movements, began to make serious imprint on society. This movement is known as Modernism. This movement is commonly known to have been greatly influenced by World War I and is speculated to have some influences from World War II. The movement is also considered to be at least partially a contributor in the causes that pushed many of the Revolutions of the time forward.

Many of the pieces created in this movement and time period contain within them similar themes. For example, one of the major themes includes the destabilization or fragmentation of the reality in which the characters exist. Waiting for Godot by Samuel Beckett is a perfect representation of this theme. Many other plays also contain within them characters and dialogue that pose questions and statements that are highly politically or socially charged and bring to the minds of the masses important perspectives on the current status of government and society of the time. John Osborne’s Look Back in Anger is a great representation of how the play’s characters are used to pose very serious questions for the time that other wise might not have been discussed through any other forum. Many plays also liked to explore the use of primitivism or reducing objects, plot devices, and characters down to the simplest forms of themselves as to explore very nuisance ideas of how to live correctly.

· Absurd Drama DW25 respond to this quote #6

https://clayton.view.usg.edu/d2l/img/lp/pixel.gif

Central theme in modern literature abandoned the Romantic period because of the spoils of war; however, many modern authors questioned the future of society and humanity.  Modernist explored the pros and cons of urban life as well as its uncertainty, dimness, and supremacy.  This departure from traditional views allowed modern literature writers to subliminally enter the characters sub-consciousness.  Modernity was symbolic of an urban movement identified with the city; whereas, the rural was associated with a more antiquated era.  In addition, modernist concentrated on the absence of basic principles, whether in politics or religion.  Generally speaking, themes of writers of modern literature were preoccupied with the inter-workings of consciousness, creating a mixture of styles that was composed of creativity and originality.

 

 

 

ABSURD DRAM

A

CO

NVERSATION

, Respond

to 6 posts

IN RELEVANT 5

7 SENTEN

CES

each?

Please notate each

numerical REMARK

with matching

numerical

RESPONSE

S

?

Use

quotations

when necessary?

Modern English Literature

·

Absurd

Drama

OC15

RESPONd to this quo

te

#1

Absurd drama is defined by works of drama created during the modern era. It is known as absurd because

of how boldly it strays away from tr

aditional ideals. Samuel Beckett’s

Waiting

for

Godot

is a play well

known

for being apart of the “Theatre of the Absurd”.

Waiting

for

Godot

is a great example of absurd drama

because every element of the play is strange and abnormal. The homelessness and d

isillusionment is

expressed in all aspects of the play; the setting, language, characters, etc. Dictionary.com defines absurd as

unreasonable, illogical, and inappropriate. Modern literature expresses a theme of absurdness of culture.

Normalcy is no longer

a thing and the elements of modernism consists of something disturbing. In Harold

Pinter’s

The

Homecoming

is absurd because it exposes dysfunction within the household. It is also absurd to

think

that the pure and innocent house wife could be a sexually p

leasing mistress to many men;

nevertheless, make her own money doing so.

The absurd element of modern literature is not only expressed through drama. It is also expressed through

poetry. In

Dulce

et

Decorum

Est,

William Yeats expresses absurdness by poeti

cally confronting the ugly

truths about war. He completely goes against the fantasized manifest destiny perspective and

uses

figurative language to convey a negative image of war; “coughing like hags”, “drunk with fatigue”,

“helpless sight”, gargling from

the froth

corrupted lungs”. Yeats paints a picture of the modern society to

expose the absurdness of the fantasy of war.

·

Absurd

drama

CL13

Respond to this quote

#2

Absurd drama was mostly written in the 1950’s and 1960’s. The term

was first defined as the human

situation as basically meaningless and ab

surd. Whereas traditional theatre attempts to create a

photographic representation of life as we see it, the Theatre of the Absurd aims to create a ritual

like,

mythological, archetypal, allegorical vision, closely related to the world of dreams. The focal

point of these

dreams is often man’s fundamental bewilderment and confusion, stemming from the fact that he has no

answers to the basic existential questions: why we are alive, why we have to die, why there is injustice and

suffering. Waiting for Godot is

a great example of this because it embodies so many elements that are

included in the definition or characteristics of of an Absurd drama.

·

Central

Themes

in

Modern

Literature

CJ12

Respond to this quote

#3

Modern Literature can be best described as being in direct contrast with traditional culture.

In Literature,

this is displayed in unreliabl

e narrators, non

linear time, a stream of consciousness

style, and an

overwhelming amount of irony and satire.

·

Central

themes

BT4

R

e

spond to this quote

#4

Modern

literature

began

around

1910

and

ended

in

the

1960s.

Some

significant

writers

of

this

period

include:

Samuel

Beckett,

James

Joyce,

Joseph

Conrad,

T.S.

Eliot,

William

Faulkner,

John

Steinbeck,

E.E.

Cummings,

Sylvia

Plath,

F.

Scott

Fitzgeral

d,

William

Butler

Yeats,

Ezra

Pound,

Ernest

Hemingway,

Virginia

Woolf,

D.H.

Lawrence,

and

Gertrude

Stein.

Of

all

writers

mentioned

above,

majority

of

the

writers

are

discussed

in

this

course.

The

theme

of

absurdity

is

a

central

theme

in

Modern

British

lite

rature.

This

theme

is

shown

in

a

number

of

readings

in

the

course

Beckett’s

Waiting

for

Godot

and

Osborne’s

Look

Back

in

Anger,

for

example.

Along

side

this

theme,

the

violence

of

WW1

is

a

major

theme

and

influence

of

the

Modern

era.

We

are

shown

this

in

Osborne’s

Look

Back

in

Anger

specifically

Jimmy

displays

this

theme

with

his

unhappy

life.

ABSURD DRAMA CONVERSATION, Respond to 6 posts IN RELEVANT 5-7 SENTENCES

each? Please notate each numerical REMARK with matching numerical

RESPONSES? Use quotations when necessary?

Modern English Literature

Absurd DramaOC15 RESPONd to this quote #1

Absurd drama is defined by works of drama created during the modern era. It is known as absurd because

of how boldly it strays away from traditional ideals. Samuel Beckett’s Waiting for Godot is a play well-known

for being apart of the “Theatre of the Absurd”. Waiting for Godot is a great example of absurd drama

because every element of the play is strange and abnormal. The homelessness and disillusionment is

expressed in all aspects of the play; the setting, language, characters, etc. Dictionary.com defines absurd as

unreasonable, illogical, and inappropriate. Modern literature expresses a theme of absurdness of culture.

Normalcy is no longer a thing and the elements of modernism consists of something disturbing. In Harold

Pinter’s The Homecoming is absurd because it exposes dysfunction within the household. It is also absurd to

think that the pure and innocent house wife could be a sexually pleasing mistress to many men;

nevertheless, make her own money doing so.

The absurd element of modern literature is not only expressed through drama. It is also expressed through

poetry. In Dulce et Decorum Est, William Yeats expresses absurdness by poetically confronting the ugly

truths about war. He completely goes against the fantasized manifest destiny perspective and

uses figurative language to convey a negative image of war; “coughing like hags”, “drunk with fatigue”,

“helpless sight”, gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs”. Yeats paints a picture of the modern society to

expose the absurdness of the fantasy of war.

Absurd dramaCL13 Respond to this quote #2

Absurd drama was mostly written in the 1950’s and 1960’s. The term was first defined as the human

situation as basically meaningless and absurd. Whereas traditional theatre attempts to create a

photographic representation of life as we see it, the Theatre of the Absurd aims to create a ritual-like,

mythological, archetypal, allegorical vision, closely related to the world of dreams. The focal point of these

dreams is often man’s fundamental bewilderment and confusion, stemming from the fact that he has no

answers to the basic existential questions: why we are alive, why we have to die, why there is injustice and

suffering. Waiting for Godot is a great example of this because it embodies so many elements that are

included in the definition or characteristics of of an Absurd drama.

Central Themes in Modern Literature

CJ12 Respond to this quote #3

Modern Literature can be best described as being in direct contrast with traditional culture. In Literature,

this is displayed in unreliable narrators, non-linear time, a stream of consciousness style, and an

overwhelming amount of irony and satire.

Central themesBT4 Respond to this quote #4

Modern literature began around 1910 and ended in the 1960s. Some significant writers of this

period include: Samuel Beckett, James Joyce, Joseph Conrad, T.S. Eliot, William Faulkner, John

Steinbeck, E.E. Cummings, Sylvia Plath, F. Scott Fitzgerald, William Butler Yeats, Ezra Pound,

Ernest Hemingway, Virginia Woolf, D.H. Lawrence, and Gertrude Stein. Of all writers

mentioned above, majority of the writers are discussed in this course.

The theme of absurdity is a central theme in Modern British literature. This theme is shown in a

number of readings in the course – Beckett’sWaiting for Godot and Osborne’s Look Back in

Anger, for example. Along side this theme, the violence of WW1 is a major theme and influence

of the Modern era. We are shown this in Osborne’s Look Back in Anger – specifically Jimmy

displays this theme with his unhappy life.


Comments are closed.