STUDY GUIDE 10: LIFE CYCLE NUTRITION — ADULTS

STUDY GUIDE 10: LIFE CYCLE NUTRITION — ADULTS

Directions. Using Chapter 17 of your textbook as a reference, answer the following questions. Please include the questions with your answers. Be sure to put your name on your document. Your answers should be thoughtful, complete, and in Standard English. Credit will not be given for answers copied from online sources.

1. Define the following

Alzheimer’s disease

Arthritis

Atrophic gastritis

Cataracts

Chronological age

Congregate meals

Dysphasia

Gout

Life expectancy

Life Span

Longevity

Macular degeneration

Meals on Wheels

Neurofibrillary tangles

Neurons

Osteoarthritis

Physiological age

Pressure ulcers

Purines

Quality of life

Rheumatoid arthritis

Sarcopenia

Senile plaques

Stress

Stressors

Stress response

2. The ‘fountain of youth’ has been a mystery for many centuries. People used believe if they drank water from the fountain, the aging process would stop. Ponce de Leon was said to be searching for the fountain when he traveled to what is now Florida in the 16th century. Today, the fountain is associated with Florida in St. Augustine. Chase, a history student, maintains that the fountain of youth is not a place or a particular thing, but rather is a combination of diet and lifestyle. How can Chase justify this claim?

3. Marie is interested in helping the elderly and works as a volunteer at a local retirement home. She has noticed that a number of the residents have decreased appetites and diminished senses of taste and smell. Also, depression seems to be common among the residents. How can Marie explain these observations?

4. Mildred is a 75-year-old retired school teacher who lives in on the gulf coast of Florida. About a year ago, Mildred lost her husband of fifty years. Mildred has three children, two of whom live out of state. Her youngest daughter, Charlene, lives about an hour away. Mildred has been retired for nine years.

Despite the demands of her teaching career, Mildred always managed to prepare and serve evening meals for her family. During retirement, she continued this routine of cooking for herself and her late husband Vernon. Now that she is living alone, Mildred continues to live independently preparing her own meals and doing light housekeeping. She has realized, however, that it is difficult to cook for only one person. On the positive side, Mildred is occasionally inspired to cook a creative meal and freeze the leftovers for later use. In recent months, Mildred has become increasingly passive about cooking and has started skipping some meals. She especially tends to forgo dinner. Some days she snacks or eats what is available in her refrigerator. She has also stopped her only form of exercise, walking on a daily basis.

Mildred prefers to live independently but Charlene, her daughter, is concerned about her mother’s change of behavior and knows that her health will decline if her nutrition doesn’t improve.

What advice would you give to Mildred?

What could she do to improve her appetite and motivation to cook?

5. The elderly may be challenged by chronic health issues as a result of physiologic challenges. They also may suffer from mental health issues as a consequence of aging. Discuss the many challenges one might work around to enhance the nutritional status of an elderly client as a healthcare professional.

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