World Literature quiz for Mary tutor

World Literature quiz for Mary tutor

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 1/13

Quiz

Question 1 (2 points)

Question 2 (2 points)

Question 3 (2 points)

Question 4 (2 points)

Note: It is recommended that you save your response as you complete each question.

SECTION I: Language and Literary Terms

According to class notes and discussions, there must be some sort of conflict (person vs. person, nation vs. nation, people vs. nature, a person vs. him­ of herself, etc.) in order for there to be what we would recognize as a story in a work of literature.

True

False

Save

According to class notes and discussions, while the term syntax refers to a writer’s specific word choices, the term diction refers to the arrangement of those worlds that actually control the meaning of those words.

True

False

Save

According to class notes and discussions, the term register refers to the use of academically correct punctuation throughout a work of poetry.

True

False

Save

According to class notes and discussions, the following example

Yesterday at school, our teacher told us to remember to bring our lunches with us for today’s field trip.

represents the correct use of the word bring because it expresses the idea of some item moving toward someone as opposed to away from him or her.

True

False

Save

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 2/13

Question 5 (2 points)

Question 6 (2 points)

Question 7 (2 points)

Question 8 (2 points)

According to class notes and discussions, the following example

Because my cousin has such difficulty expressing himself sometimes, I could not tell what he was trying to infer to me regarding the money I owe him.

represents the correct use of the word infer.

True

False

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, “jumbo shrimp,” “living death”, and “seriously funny” are all examples of the language device known as __________.

register

oxymoron

anaphora

morphology

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, the following examples

“I kid you not.” “Happy, I was.” “Strong, you have become.”

represent instances of the language device known as __________.

register

oxymoron

anaphora

inversion

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, the conceptual definition of language is __________.

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 3/13

Question 9 (2 points)

Question 10 (2 points)

Question 11 (2 points)

the particular way that people sound when they speak that indicates where they are from

always using a word’s correct spelling

dictionary definitions of all of a given language’s words

a system that allows smaller, more simplistic units of meaning to be combined into larger, more complex expressions of meaning

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, Dr. Shafer’s definition of the term rhetoric is __________.

language that engages its listeners in a thoroughly humorous manner

language used in academically correct ways

language used to inform, persuade, and/or entertain a specific audience

a system that allows smaller, more simplistic units of meaning to be combined into larger, more complex expressions of meaning

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, the term style refers to __________.

the culmination of all of a person’s choices made from all of the available options in a given language (diction, syntax, punctuation, paragraphing, register, etc.)

the direct repetition of specific words in a literary text to create a particular effect

language used to inform, persuade, and/or entertain a specific audience

a system that allows smaller, more simplistic units of meaning to be combined into larger, more complex expressions of meaning

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, the following examples

green packaging used for red fruit placing a tall person right next to a short one an extremely good character being forced to fight directly against an extremely evil one

represent the literary device known as

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 4/13

Question 12 (2 points)

Question 13 (2 points)

__________.

register

oxymoron

anaphora

juxtaposition

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, the underlined portions of the following example

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to South Carolina, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed.

represent the language device known as __________.

register

oxymoron

anaphora

juxtaposition

Save

SECTION II: Course Readings

Choose the word or phrase that correctly completes the following direct quote from William Shakespeare’s poem “Sonnet 29”

Yet in these thoughts myself almost despising,  Haply I think on thee, and then my state,  (Like to the __________ at break of day arising  From sullen earth) sings hymns at heaven’s gate;

rooster

lark

song

prayer

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 5/13

Question 14 (2 points)

Question 15 (2 points)

Question 16 (2 points)

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, the underlined portion from the following direct quote from William Shakespeare’s poem “Sonnet 29”

When, in disgrace with fortune and men’s eyes,  I all alone beweep my outcast state,  And trouble deaf heaven with my bootless cries,  And look upon myself and curse my fate,

most likely means that __________.

the speaker of the poem has no clothes

the speaker of the poem is praying to God but God is not answering him

the speaker of the poem is in deep trouble with the current King of the land

the speaker of the poem is losing his sense of hearing

Save

Choose the word or phrase that correctly completes the following direct quote from Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem “We Real Cool”

We real cool. We  Left school. We

Lurk late. We  Strike straight. We

Sing sin. We  Thin gin. We

__________. We  Die soon.

Steal Sun

Lose Life

Jazz June

Miss May

Save

Based on class notes and discussions, the following direct quote from Gwendolyn Brooks’ poem “We Real Cool”

THE POOL PLAYERS.   SEVEN AT THE GOLDEN SHOVEL.

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 6/13

Question 17 (2 points)

Question 18 (2 points)

Question 19 (2 points)

is most likely a device borrowed from __________.

civil rights speeches

old novels

religious songs

plays or films

Save

Based on the Handout on Basic Literary Critical & Theoretical Approaches (provided in class on Wed, Feb 28), Marxist Literary Criticism is interested in __________.

how different word classes are used in literary texts

how money and the unequal distribution of power relationships affect how literature is produced

how a writer’s background directly influences his or her writing style

how oppositional binaries are expressed in literary texts

Save

Based on the Handout on Basic Literary Critical & Theoretical Approaches (provided in class on Wed, Feb 28), one of the key terms of Psychoanalytic Criticism is __________.

Mythemes: the smallest component parts of a myth (similar to how morphemes combine in order to form words)

Persona: the image we represent to the world

Symbolic: the stage marking a child’s entrance into language (the ability to understand and operate symbols)

Ethnocentrism: the evaluation of other cultures according to preconceptions originating in the  standards, conventions, and customs of one’s own culture

Save

Based on the Handout on Basic Literary Critical & Theoretical Approaches (provided in class on Wed, Feb 28), one of the key terms of Linguistic Criticism is __________.

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 7/13

Question 20 (2 points)

Question 21 (10 points)

Mythemes: the smallest component parts of a myth (similar to how morphemes combine in order to form words)

Persona: the image we represent to the world

Symbolic: the stage marking a child’s entrance into language (the ability to understand and operate symbols)

Pragmatics: the study of how utterances are used in communicative acts, and the role played by  context and non­linguistic knowledge in the transmission of meaning

Save

Based on the Handout on Basic Literary Critical & Theoretical Approaches (provided in class on Wed, Feb 28), one of the writers most closely associated with Archetypal/Mythic Criticism is __________.

Joseph Campbell

Peter Brooks

Fredric Jameson

Edward Said

Save

SECTION III: Literary Texts Analysis and Discussion

In the following poem, “This is Just to Say” (1934) by William Carlos Williams, locate, number, label, list—and briefly explain the meaning of—twenty examples of different uses of language to create specific kinds of meanings and construct different patterns. These can be literal and figurative, but remember to be specific. There are, of course, many different kinds of meaning and language structures that produce these meanings, and we have practiced identifying a number of them in class. You can always rely on the SAYS? MEANS? DOES? questions about language in literary texts that we have been practicing with this whole semester. You may, of course, use any handouts and assignments from this class to help you. However, if you simply copy and paste information directly from the Internet (or any other source, for that matter), you will regrettably receive a zero for the entire Exam. Please do your own work; it is open­book and open­note after all.

“This is Just to Say” (1934) by William Carlos Williams

I have eaten  the plums  that were in

the icebox and which  you were probably  saving  for breakfast

Forgive me  they were delicious  so sweet  and so cold.

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 8/13

Question 22 (10 points)

Question 23 (10 points)

Format

Save

In the following poem, “This Be The Verse” (1971) by Philip Larkin, label, list—and briefly explain the meaning of—twenty examples of different uses of language to create specific kinds of meanings and construct different patterns. These can be literal and figurative, but remember to be specific. There are, of course, many different kinds of meaning and language structures that produce these meanings, and we have practiced identifying a number of them in class. You can always rely on the SAYS? MEANS? DOES? questions about language in literary texts that we have been practicing with this whole semester. You may, of course, use any handouts and assignments from this class to help you. However, if you simply copy and paste information directly from the Internet (or any other source, for that matter), you will regrettably receive a zero for the entire Exam. Please do your own work; it is open­book and open­note after all.

“This Be The Verse” (1971) by Philip Larkin

They fuck you up, your mum and dad.        They may not mean to, but they do.   They fill you with the faults they had       And add some extra, just for you.

But they were fucked up in their turn       By fools in old­style hats and coats,   Who half the time were soppy­stern       And half at one another’s throats.

Man hands on misery to man.       It deepens like a coastal shelf.  Get out as early as you can,       And don’t have any kids yourself.

Format

Save

 

 

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 9/13

In the following song, “Bad Blood” (2014) by Taylor Swift, label, list—and briefly explain the meaning of—twenty examples of different uses of language to create specific kinds of meanings and construct different patterns. These can be literal and figurative, but remember to be specific. There are, of course, many different kinds of meaning and language structures that produce these meanings, and we have practiced identifying a number of them in class. You can always rely on the SAYS? MEANS? DOES? questions about language in literary texts that we have been practicing with this whole semester. You may, of course, use any handouts and assignments from this class to help you. However, if you simply copy and paste information directly from the Internet (or any other source, for that matter), you will regrettably receive a zero for the entire Exam. Please do your own work; it is open­book and open­note after all.

“Bad Blood” (2014) by Taylor Swift

CHORUS  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood  You know it used to be mad love  So take a look what you’ve done  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!  Now we’ve got problems  And I don’t think we can solve ’em  You made a really deep cut  And baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!

VERSE 1  Did you have to do this?  I was thinking that you could be trusted  Did you have to ruin what was shiny?  Now it’s all rusted  Did you have to hit me where I’m weak?  Baby, I couldn’t breathe  And rub it in so deep  Salt in the wound like you’re laughing right at me

BUILD  Oh, it’s so sad to  Think about the good times  You and I

CHORUS  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood  You know it used to be mad love  So take a look what you’ve done  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!  Now we’ve got problems  And I don’t think we can solve ’em  You made a really deep cut  And baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!

VERSE 2  Did you think we’d be fine?  Still got scars in my back from your knives  So don’t think it’s in the past  These kind of wounds they last and they last  Now, did you think it all through?  All these things will catch up to you  And time can heal, but this won’t  So if you come in my way  Just don’t

BUILD  Oh, it’s so sad to  Think about the good times  You and I

CHORUS  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood  You know it used to be mad love  So take a look what you’ve done  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!  Now we’ve got problems  And I don’t think we can solve ’em  You made a really deep cut  And baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!

BRIDGE  Band­aids don’t fix bullet holes  You say sorry just for show  You live like that, you live with ghosts

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 10/13

Question 24 (10 points)

Band­aids don’t fix bullet holes  You say sorry just for show  If you live like that, you live with ghosts  If you love like that, blood runs cold!

CHORUS  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood  You know it used to be mad love  So take a look what you’ve done  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!  Now we’ve got problems  And I don’t think we can solve ’em  You made a really deep cut  And baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!

Format

Save

After completing your lists of language usages and devices, compose (at least) two well­developed paragraphs (remember to use the CLAIM → EVIDENCE → EXPLANATION pattern in your answers) that respond to the following prompt:

Provide five reasons why you could argue that the poem “This is Just to Say” by William Carlos Williams is NOT a poem. Then, provide five reasons why you could argue that it IS a poem. Make sure to explain every choice.

“This is Just to Say” (1934) by William Carlos Williams

I have eaten  the plums  that were in

the icebox and which  you were probably  saving  for breakfast

Forgive me  they were delicious  so sweet  and so cold.

 

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 11/13

Question 25 (10 points)

Question 26 (10 points)

Format

Save

After completing your lists of language usages and devices, compose (at least) two well­developed paragraphs (remember to use the CLAIM → EVIDENCE → EXPLANATION pattern in your answers) that respond to the following prompt:

The poem “This Be The Verse” by Philip Larkin offers a pretty negative view of the effects that parents can have on their children. Do you agree or disagree with this poem’s viewpoint? Explain.

“This Be The Verse” (1971) by Philip Larkin (1922–1985)

They fuck you up, your mum and dad.        They may not mean to, but they do.   They fill you with the faults they had       And add some extra, just for you.

But they were fucked up in their turn       By fools in old­style hats and coats,   Who half the time were soppy­stern       And half at one another’s throats.

Man hands on misery to man.       It deepens like a coastal shelf.  Get out as early as you can,       And don’t have any kids yourself.

Format

Save

After completing your lists of language usages and devices, compose (at least) two well­developed paragraphs (remember to use the CLAIM → EVIDENCE → EXPLANATION pattern in your answers) that respond to the following prompt:

 

 

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 12/13

Find (at least) five oppositional binaries that stand out to you in Taylor Swift’s song “Bad Blood” and explain why they seem to be so important to the meaning of the song.

“Bad Blood” (2014) from the album 1989 by Taylor Swift (1989–)    CHORUS  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood  You know it used to be mad love  So take a look what you’ve done  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!  Now we’ve got problems  And I don’t think we can solve ’em  You made a really deep cut  And baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!

VERSE 1  Did you have to do this?  I was thinking that you could be trusted  Did you have to ruin what was shiny?  Now it’s all rusted  Did you have to hit me where I’m weak?  Baby, I couldn’t breathe  And rub it in so deep  Salt in the wound like you’re laughing right at me

BUILD  Oh, it’s so sad to  Think about the good times  You and I

CHORUS  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood  You know it used to be mad love  So take a look what you’ve done  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!  Now we’ve got problems  And I don’t think we can solve ’em  You made a really deep cut  And baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!

VERSE 2  Did you think we’d be fine?  Still got scars in my back from your knives  So don’t think it’s in the past  These kind of wounds they last and they last  Now, did you think it all through?  All these things will catch up to you  And time can heal, but this won’t  So if you come in my way  Just don’t

BUILD  Oh, it’s so sad to  Think about the good times  You and I

CHORUS  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood  You know it used to be mad love  So take a look what you’ve done  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!  Now we’ve got problems  And I don’t think we can solve ’em  You made a really deep cut  And baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!

BRIDGE  Band­aids don’t fix bullet holes  You say sorry just for show  You live like that, you live with ghosts  Band­aids don’t fix bullet holes  You say sorry just for show  If you live like that, you live with ghosts  If you love like that, blood runs cold!

3/18/2018 Quiz – World Literature – Tennessee State University

https://elearn.tnstate.edu/d2l/lms/quizzing/user/attempt/quiz_start_frame.d2l?ou=7233152&isprv=&drc=0&qi=7102874&cfql=0&dnb=0 13/13

CHORUS  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood  You know it used to be mad love  So take a look what you’ve done  ’Cause baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!  Now we’ve got problems  And I don’t think we can solve ’em  You made a really deep cut  And baby, now we’ve got bad blood, hey!

Paragraph

Save

 

Save All Responses Go to Submit Quiz

 


Comments are closed.